<html>
<head>
<style><!--
.hmmessage P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body.hmmessage
{
font-size: 10pt;
font-family:Verdana
}
--></style>
</head>
<body class='hmmessage'>
We could/should&nbsp;probably all&nbsp;just&nbsp;start our own collective&nbsp;(corporate) entity to produce&nbsp;software, based on the&nbsp;premises that <BR>
1) software built with Haskell will be more robust, and&nbsp;<BR>
2)&nbsp;software built by developers who have an affinity and aptitude for this language will tend to write better software.<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
When the products themselves gain a positive reputation with the general public, then the corporation itself&nbsp;and those&nbsp;invested will benefit.&nbsp; <BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
.... cheers heard across the world ....<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
A U.S. president&nbsp;would probably subsidize such a job-creating endeavor too!<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
Nay-sayers are probably predominately composed of those who do not understand it or&nbsp;its benefits.<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
<BR>&nbsp;<BR>&gt; Date: Wed, 10 Feb 2010 19:26:22 +0000<BR>&gt; From: andrewcoppin@btinternet.com<BR>&gt; To: haskell-cafe@haskell.org<BR>&gt; Subject: Re: [Haskell-cafe] How many "Haskell Engineer I/II/III"s are there?<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Jason Dusek wrote:<BR>&gt; &gt; Although I'm fond of Haskell, in practice I am not a<BR>&gt; &gt; Haskell programmer -- I'm paid for Ruby and Bourne shell<BR>&gt; &gt; programming.<BR>&gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; &gt; Many of the jobs posted on this list end up being jobs<BR>&gt; &gt; for people who appreciate Haskell but will work in C# or<BR>&gt; &gt; O'Caml or some-such.<BR>&gt; &gt;<BR>&gt; &gt; I wonder how many people actually write Haskell,<BR>&gt; &gt; principally or exclusively, at work?<BR>&gt; &gt; <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; I usually estimate the answer to this question by looking up how many <BR>&gt; employees WellTyped.com and Galois.com have between them, under the <BR>&gt; simplifying assumption that the number of other people using Haskell is <BR>&gt; probably so utterly insignificant that it doesn't matter.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; I'd love to see Haskell become popular, but it doesn't seem to be in any <BR>&gt; rush to happen just yet. (Then again, I gather 10 years ago things were <BR>&gt; far, far worse than they are today...)<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Some people (especially C programmers) have tried to tell me that <BR>&gt; Haskell is too slow. Others have claimed it's too incomprehensible. <BR>&gt; "People inherantly thing sequentially, not set-theoretically" they say. <BR>&gt; (Last time I checked, nobody's complaining about SQL being <BR>&gt; unintuitive...) "People don't think recursively" is another <BR>&gt; commonly-sited objection. Still others point out that Haskell is a <BR>&gt; *pure* functional language, and all the most popular languages are <BR>&gt; hybrids. Eiffel is a pure-OO language, but the hybrids like Java and C++ <BR>&gt; far vastly more popular. I myself might point out the comparative <BR>&gt; immaturity of things on Windows (the single biggest target platform on <BR>&gt; the market), and the rough edges on tools like Darcs, Haddock and Cabal. <BR>&gt; If enough people become interested, all these things could (and <BR>&gt; hopefully would) be fixed. It's a question of whether we reach the <BR>&gt; necessary critical mass or not...<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; _______________________________________________<BR>&gt; Haskell-Cafe mailing list<BR>&gt; Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org<BR>&gt; http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe<BR>                                               </body>
</html>