<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>On Feb 16, 2010, at 9:43 AM, Gregg Reynolds wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; ">I've looked through at least a dozen.&nbsp; For neophytes, the best of the bunch BY FAR is Goldblatt,&nbsp;<a href="http://digital.library.cornell.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=math;cc=math;q1=Goldblatt;view=toc;idno=gold010">Topoi: the categorial analysis of logic</a><span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span>.&nbsp; Don't be put off by the title.&nbsp; He not only explains the stuff, but he explains the problems that motivated the invention of the stuff.&nbsp; He doesn't cover monads, but he covers all the basics very clearly, so once you've got that down you can move to another author for monads.<br></span></blockquote></div><br><div>He does cover monads, briefly. &nbsp;They're called "triples" in this context, and the chapter on interpretations of the intuitionistic logic depend on functorial/monadic techniques. &nbsp;If I remember correctly, he uses the techniques and abstracts from them.</div></body></html>