<div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Feb 28, 2010 at 6:30 PM, Andrew Coppin <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:andrewcoppin@btinternet.com">andrewcoppin@btinternet.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div class="im">Daniel Fischer wrote:<br></div></blockquote><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;"><div class="im">
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">if [ -z `/bin/echo ${PATH} | /usr/bin/grep cabal` ]</blockquote></div><div class="im"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

then<br>
    export PATH=&quot;/home/andrew/.cabal/bin:$PATH&quot;<br>
fi<br>
<br>
in your .bashrc<br>
  <br>
</blockquote>
<br></div>
Uh... what?</blockquote><div><br></div><div>that snippet supposes you have cabal installed in your home directory under the directory &quot;.cabal&quot;. The binary file would be in the bin subdirectory of &quot;.cabal&quot;</div>
<div>Names that start with a . are hidden files/directories on linux, by the way.</div><div>So the first line checks if you have &quot;cabal&quot; in your path list. If not, on the 3rd line it supposes your home directory is /home/andrew and adds the cabal binary directory to your path list.</div>
<div><br></div><div>David.</div><div><br></div></div>