I don&#39;t think a Haskell-monad book would be terribly interesting. †A book on taking the pieces of category theory, with a little bit more of the math, to apply to Haskell would be greatly interesting to me.<div><br></div>
<div>Also a book on learning what to look for for measuring Haskell performance in space and time + optimization seems like it&#39;d be a good thing to have as well.</div><div><br></div><div>Monad in itself is really simple. †Some of the implementations of Monad can be a little mind bending at times, but the Monad itself is not really that complicated.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Dave<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">2010/3/1 GŁnther Schmidt <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:gue.schmidt@web.de">gue.schmidt@web.de</a>&gt;</span><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
Hi all,<br>
<br>
there seems to be a huge number of things that monads can be used for. And there are lots of papers, blog posts, etc. describing that, some more or less accessible.<br>
<br>
Apart from monads there are of course also Applicative Functors, Monoids, Arrows and what have you. But in short the Monad thingy seems to be the most &quot;powerful&quot; one of them all.<br>
<br>
Is there a book that specializes on Monads? A Haskell-Monad book?<br>
<br>
GŁnther<br>
<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org" target="_blank">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br></div>