<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Mar 27, 2010 at 9:05 AM, Daniel Fischer <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:daniel.is.fischer@web.de">daniel.is.fischer@web.de</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
-----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----<br>
Von: &quot;Günther Schmidt&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:gue.schmidt@web.de">gue.schmidt@web.de</a>&gt;<br>
Gesendet: 27.03.2010 16:14:57<br>
An: <a href="mailto:haskell-cafe@haskell.org">haskell-cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
Betreff: [Haskell-cafe] Are there any female Haskellers?<br>
<div class="im"><br>
&gt;Hi all,<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;from the names of people on the list it seems that all users here are males.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;Just out of curiosity are there any female users here, or are we guys<br>
&gt;only at the moment?<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;Günther<br>
&gt;<br>
<br>
</div>I&#39;m pretty sure that Phil(l?)ip(p?)a Cowderoy is female, I&#39;ve also seen a couple of other female names here and on the beginners list.<br>
(Since Ashley Yakeley seems to be located in the USA, I dare not guess whether Ashley is a man&#39;s name or a woman&#39;s in this case.)<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Ashley Yakeley is a man.</div><div><br></div><div>
I work with several female Haskellers.  And I&#39;ve met several others who are at universities or use Haskell on the side.</div><div><br></div><div>In general, I&#39;d say women in computer science are a minority.  I would say mathematics has a higher percentage of women than computer science from my own anecdotal experience.  Why are there so few women in computer science?  I don&#39;t know but it&#39;s an interesting question.  One professor I was talking to about this subject said he felt that at his university when CS was a part of math there were more women and when it became part of engineering the percentage of women dropped.</div>
<div><br></div><div>It&#39;s possible that there are gender differences that cause men to be attracted to this field more frequently than women.  I&#39;m hesitant to say that&#39;s the underlying reason though.  I suspect the following, based on conversations I&#39;ve had with women in the field.  For some reason it started out as a male dominated field.  Let&#39;s assume for cultural reasons.  Once it became a male dominated field, us males unknowingly made the work and learning environments somewhat hostile or unattractive to women.  I bet I would feel out of place if I were the only male in a class of 100 women.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Anyway, those are just observations I&#39;ve made.  Don&#39;t take any of it too seriously and I certainly don&#39;t mean to offend anyone.  I know gender differences can be quite controversial at times.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Jason</div></div>