<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><br><div><div>On Jun 8, 2010, at 2:38 AM, Alberto G. Corona wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; ">This is`t a manifestation of the Curry-Howard isomorphism?</span></blockquote></div><div><br></div><div>Yes, basically.</div><div><br></div><div>If we rephrase the isomorphism as "<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; "><i>a proof is a program, the formula it proves is a type for the program"</i>&nbsp;(as Wikipedia states it), we can see the connection. &nbsp;The "characterization" of prelBreak I gave is a "type" for prelBreak. &nbsp;The type is richer than we can express in the Haskell type system ("<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: medium; line-height: normal; ">prelbreak accepts a proposition p and a list xs, and returns a pair whose first element is the largest prefix of xs for which no x satisfies p, and whose second element is the complement of the first, taken in xs.")<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 19px; ">, but we can still reason about the richer type mathematically, and the Curry-Howard isomorphism applies to it.</span></span></span></div></body></html>