It&#39;s weird I was just thinking about LP in Haskell this morning. Check out John Milliken&#39;s dbus-core [1] written entirely in noweb. It is a pleasure to read and I am seriously considering adopting the technique for my Haskell projects. <br>
<br>-deech<br>[1] <a href="http://ianen.org/haskell/dbus/">http://ianen.org/haskell/dbus/</a><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Jun 12, 2010 at 12:21 PM, Martin Drautzburg <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:Martin.Drautzburg@web.de">Martin.Drautzburg@web.de</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">Hello all,<br>
<br>
Is literate programming something you guys actually do (I only know that Paul<br>
Hudak does), or is it basically a nice idea from days gone by?<br>
<br>
In case you do, then how do you do it? Do you use lhs2TeX or what? Do you<br>
use &quot;bird&quot; style of full-blown LaTeX?<br>
<br>
Does any of you use leksah? I failed to see any support for literate<br>
programming in leksah. It candies the backslashes in e.g.<br>
\documentclass{article} to ╬╗documentclass{article}.<br>
<br>
In case you don&#39;t, then how do you document your code? If you write a paper<br>
which explains what your code does, then how do you do that?<br>
<font color="#888888"><br>
--<br>
Martin<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
</font></blockquote></div><br>