<div dir="ltr">Thank you all for replying!<div><br></div><div>I am really beginning my baby steps in this fascinating language, and was just wondering if it was possible to naturally scan lists with arbitrary lists (aka trees :) ).</div>

<div><br></div><div>I guess this forum specifically is too advancaed for me (yet!), so my next questions will be posted on the beginners forum.</div><div><br></div><div>Thanks,</div><div>Vadali<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">

On Tue, Jul 13, 2010 at 11:07 AM, Ivan Lazar Miljenovic <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ivan.miljenovic@gmail.com">ivan.miljenovic@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">

<div class="im">vadali &lt;<a href="mailto:shlomivaknin@gmail.com">shlomivaknin@gmail.com</a>&gt; writes:<br>
<br>
&gt; hello,<br>
&gt; iam really new to haskell,<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; i want to define a function which takes as a parameter a list which can<br>
&gt; contain other lists, eg. [1,[2,3],[4,[5,6]]]<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; how would i define a function that can iterate through the items so (in this<br>
&gt; example)<br>
&gt; iter1 = 1<br>
&gt; iter2 = [2,3]<br>
&gt; iter3 = [4,[5,6]]<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; ?<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; ( can i do that without using the Tree data type? )<br>
<br>
</div>Well, that&#39;s what a tree is, so why not use a tree?<br>
<br>
Your only other option is to define your own tree-like structure:<br>
<br>
data MyTree a = Value a | SubTree [MyTree a]<br>
<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; THANKS!<br>
<br>
YOUR WELCOME! :p<br>
<font color="#888888"><br>
--<br>
Ivan Lazar Miljenovic<br>
<a href="mailto:Ivan.Miljenovic@gmail.com">Ivan.Miljenovic@gmail.com</a><br>
<a href="http://IvanMiljenovic.wordpress.com" target="_blank">IvanMiljenovic.wordpress.com</a><br>
</font></blockquote></div><br></div></div>