I did`nt care about the underlying theory behind monads once I learn that the easy way to understand them is trough desugarization. Desugarize the &quot;do&quot; notation, after that, desugarize the &gt;&gt;= and &gt;&gt;  operators down to the function call notation and suddenly everithing lost its magic because it becomes clear that a haskell monad is a sugarization of plain  functional tricks.<div>

<br></div><div>But it seems that the trick is so productive because it comes from some fundamental properties of math, the reality, and maybe the human mind . Jost now I found this article: </div><div><br></div><div><a href="http://www.ploscompbiol.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000858?utm_source=feedburner&amp;utm_medium=feed&amp;utm_campaign=Feed:+ploscompbiol/NewArticles+(PLoS+Computational+Biology:+New+Articles)">Categorial Compositionality: A Category Theory Explanation for the Systematicity of Human Cognition</a></div>

<div><br></div><div>That definitively gives me the motivation to learn category theory seriously.</div><div><br></div><div>Alberto</div><div><br></div><div><a href="http://www.ploscompbiol.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000858?utm_source=feedburner&amp;utm_medium=feed&amp;utm_campaign=Feed:+ploscompbiol/NewArticles+(PLoS+Computational+Biology:+New+Articles)"></a><br>

<br><div class="gmail_quote">2010/8/7 Michael Mossey <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:mpm@alumni.caltech.edu">mpm@alumni.caltech.edu</a>&gt;</span><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">

When I started to study Haskell, I was surprised that so much emphasis was placed on simple things. Monads were introduced to me as basically a wrapper, and a bind function that unwrapped something and wrapped something else back up again. I didn&#39;t understand what the fuss was about. Later I saw the amazing feats of expressiveness that were possible. I scratched my head in confusion---&quot;Wait, say that again?&quot;<br>


<br>
Here&#39;s a quote from Bertrand Russell about philosophy (read: Haskell). He&#39;s actually being humorous, but it applies, in a way:<br>
<br>
&quot;The point of philosophy is to start with something so simple as not to seem worth stating, and to end with something so paradoxical no one will believe it.&quot;<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org" target="_blank">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br></div>