<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Aug 17, 2010 at 13:29, Ketil Malde <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ketil@malde.org">ketil@malde.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">

<div class="im">Tako Schotanus &lt;<a href="mailto:tako@codejive.org">tako@codejive.org</a>&gt; writes:<br>
<br>
</div><div class="im">&gt;&gt; Just like Char is capable of encoding any valid Unicode codepoint.<br>
<br>
&gt; Unless a Char in Haskell is 32 bits (or at least more than 16 bits) it con<br>
&gt; NOT encode all Unicode points.<br>
<br>
</div>And since it can encode (or rather, represent) any valid Unicode<br>
codepoint, it follows that it is 32 bits (and at least more than 16<br>
bits).<br>
<br>
:-)<br>
<br>
(Char is basically a 32bit value, limited valid Unicode code points, so<br>
it corresponds to UCS-4/UTF-32.)<br>
<div><div></div><div class="h5"><br></div></div></blockquote></div><br>Yeah, I tried looking it up but I could find the technical definition for Char, but in the end I found that &quot;maxBound&quot; was &quot;0x10FFFF&quot; making it basically 24 bits :)<br>

<br>I know for example that Java uses only 16 bits for its Chars and therefore can NOT give you all Unicode code points with a single Char, with Strings you can because of the extension points.<br><br>-Tako<br><br>