<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
    Or if you want to keep the advantages of a powerful type system, you
    can use Scala.<br>
    <br>
    Cheers,<br>
    Greg<br>
    <br>
    On 10/28/10 9:53 PM, aditya siram wrote:
    <blockquote
      cite="mid:AANLkTin14jh3t9yKhGn=piU2JzQRMai3jo_5pX=wOqdj@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">I understand your frustration at not having free
      tested libs ready-to-go, Java/any-other-mainstream-language
      programmers tend to expect this and usually get it. <br>
      <br>
      If a lack of libs is a dealbreaker for you and you want to use a
      functional programming language with some of Haskell's advantages
      (like immutability, lazy data structures and STM) I encourage you
      to check out Clojure [1] a nicely designed Lisp. It is tightly
      integrated in to the JVM and you have access to all the Java libs
      you want. <br>
      <br>
      -deech<br>
      <br>
      [1] <a moz-do-not-send="true" href="http://clojure.org/">http://clojure.org/</a><br>
      <br>
      <div class="gmail_quote">2010/10/27 G&uuml;nther Schmidt <span
          dir="ltr">&lt;<a moz-do-not-send="true"
            href="mailto:gue.schmidt@web.de">gue.schmidt@web.de</a>&gt;</span><br>
        <blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt
          0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204);
          padding-left: 1ex;">Hi Malcolm,<br>
          <br>
          well if I would like to point out that, for instance, Haskell
          exists for a lot more than 10 years now, and that, while the
          language per se rocks, and there are cool tools (cabal) and
          libraries (list, Set, Map), there still isn't even a mail
          client library, I wonder whom to escalate this to, and who is
          going to do something about it.<br>
          <br>
          I understand some parties wish to avoid success at all costs,
          while others, commercial users, benefit from the edge haskell
          gives them already and which probably can help themselves in
          case of, again, for instance a missing mail client library.<br>
          <br>
          And then there is the ones like me, which also want to benefit
          from the edge Haskell gives them over users of other languages
          and want to develop Real World Apps and who cannot easily help
          themselves in case of a missing mail client library.<br>
          <br>
          <br>
          So while there are many aspects of the future of haskell, who
          effectively is it that steers the boat?<br>
          <font color="#888888">
            <br>
            G&uuml;nther</font>
          <div>
            <div class="h5"><br>
              _______________________________________________<br>
              Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
              <a moz-do-not-send="true"
                href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org" target="_blank">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
              <a moz-do-not-send="true"
                href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe"
                target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
            </div>
          </div>
        </blockquote>
      </div>
      <br>
      <pre wrap="">
<fieldset class="mimeAttachmentHeader"></fieldset>
_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a>
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a>
</pre>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>