<div class="gmail_quote">On 19 November 2010 22:14, Albert Y. C. Lai <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:trebla@vex.net">trebla@vex.net</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">

<div class="im">On 10-11-19 04:39 PM, Matthew Steele wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
TAPL is also a great book for getting up to speed on type theory:<br>
<br>
<a href="http://www.cis.upenn.edu/~bcpierce/tapl/" target="_blank">http://www.cis.upenn.edu/~bcpierce/tapl/</a><br>
<br>
I am no type theorist, and I nonetheless found it very approachable.<br>
</blockquote>
<br></div>
TAPL is surprisingly easy-going. It is long (many pages and many chapters, each chapter short), but it is the good kind of long: long but gradual ramp to get you to the hard stuff. Its first chapter explains convincingly why you should care about types to begin with (summary: a lightweight formal method).<br>


<br>
But it is not entirely for Haskell. It covers subtyping, and it doesn&#39;t cover type classes.<br>
<br>
It is also too bulky to be mobile (because it&#39;s long).</blockquote><div><br></div><div>IIRC It Does not deal Hindley-Milner type system at all. i.e. it does not cover ML&#39;s type system.</div><div><br></div><div>Its successor ATTAPL :-</div>

<div><br></div><div>    <a href="http://www.cis.upenn.edu/~bcpierce/attapl/index.html">http://www.cis.upenn.edu/~bcpierce/attapl/index.html</a></div><div><br></div><div>Handles an ML like type systems using constraints.</div>

<div><br></div><div>AFAICT This area area of type theory&#39;s history is not covered properly in any of the sources I have came across.</div><div><br></div><div>Aaron</div><div><br></div></div>