<div class="gmail_quote">On 5 December 2010 18:34, Daniel Peebles <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:pumpkingod@gmail.com">pumpkingod@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">

Oh yeah, the 2.0 stuff that snobby techies love to hate :) hrrmpf back in my day we programmed in binary using a magnetized needle on the exposed tape! I don&#39;t need any of this newfangled bull****.<div><br></div><div>

I kid! But I am curious to see why people are so opposed to this stuff? The attitude &quot;I can&#39;t see any reason for it to exist&quot; (without having seriously tried it) seems similar to that our (haskell&#39;s) detractors use when taking a cursory glance at it and saying the syntax doesn&#39;t make sense. </div>

</blockquote><div><br></div><div>Of course, their use lies in their popularity. To be popular you have to be (1) well designed/usable and (2) stable/aka never down. This is why e.g. Github is extremely useful. It&#39;s well designed so it&#39;s easy to use, it&#39;s popular so most people are familiar with the interface, and it has near-perfect uptime. I frown a bit when someone provides a link to their Git repository and it&#39;s some custom repo viewer or non at all on a domain that may or may not exist next week. Twitter, reddit and blogspot are pretty much ideal for reporting on uptime issues.</div>

<div><br></div><div>On 5 December 2010 18:00, Brandon S Allbery KF8NH <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:allbery@ece.cmu.edu">allbery@ece.cmu.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0.8ex; border-left-width: 1px; border-left-color: rgb(204, 204, 204); border-left-style: solid; padding-left: 1ex; ">

Twitter might be the one idea worse than reddit for this kind of thing....<br></blockquote><div> </div></div><div>Why?</div></div>