<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Mar 28, 2011 at 8:06 AM, John Millikin <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jmillikin@gmail.com">jmillikin@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
On Sunday, March 27, 2011 9:45:23 PM UTC-7, Ertugrul Soeylemez wrote:<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;"><p>&gt; For setting a global timeout on an entire session, it&#39;s better to wrap<br>
&gt; the ``run_`` call with ``System.Timeout.timeout`` -- this is more<br>&gt; efficient than testing the time on every chunk, and does not require a<br>&gt; specialised enumerator.</p>It may be more efficient, but I don&#39;t really like it.  I like robust<br>
<p>applications, and to me killing a thread is always a mistake, even if<br>the thread is kill-safe.</p></blockquote><div>``timeout`` doesn&#39;t kill the thread, it just returns ``Nothing`` if the computation took longer than expected.<br>
</div></blockquote><div><br><pre><span class="hs-definition"></span><br>Timeout does kill the thread that is used for timing out :-).  The thread that measures the timeout throws an exception to the worker thread that&#39;s being monitored. <br>
<br>Either way you&#39;re interrupting a thread.  Kill it or toss an exception at it, I don&#39;t see the difference really.  <br><br>Dave<br></pre> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
<div></div><br>_______________________________________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br>