<div dir="ltr">On Sun, Aug 21, 2011 at 20:29, Richard O&#39;Keefe <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ok@cs.otago.ac.nz">ok@cs.otago.ac.nz</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div class="im">Values in data bases often represent sums of money, for which reading (1) is</div>
appropriate.  One tenth of $2.53 is $0.253; rounding that to $0.25 would in<br>
some circumstances count as fraud.<br>
<br>
Of course, values in data bases often represent physical measurements, for which<br>
reading (2) is appropriate.  There is, however, no SQL data type that expresses<br>
this intent.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Interestingly, my original exposure to this was math for physics, which would imply reading (2) if I understand this correctly, yet I was taught (1).  (Later exposure was for business databases, so (1) was still appropriate.)</div>
</div><div><br></div>-- <br>brandon s allbery                                      <a href="mailto:allbery.b@gmail.com" target="_blank">allbery.b@gmail.com</a><br>wandering unix systems administrator (available)     (412) 475-9364 vm/sms<br>
<br>
</div>