And as Daniel mentioned earlier, it&#39;s not at all obvious what we mean by &quot;bits used&quot; when it comes to negative numbers. GMP pretends that any negative number has infinite bits in the two&#39;s-complement representation. Should we count the highest _unset_ bit when the number is negative?<div>
<br></div><div>Or to put it another way, what invariants should the proposed bit-counting function satisfy?<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Aug 25, 2011 at 6:32 PM, Albert Y. C. Lai <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:trebla@vex.net">trebla@vex.net</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;"><div class="im">On 11-08-25 01:57 PM, Andrew Coppin wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Does anybody else think it would be *far* more useful if bitSize applied<br>
to an Integer would tell you how many bits that particular Integer is<br>
using? Especially given that it can vary?<br>
</blockquote>
<br></div>
It is useful to know the number of bits used in a value.<br>
<br>
It is useful to know the maximum number of bits storable in a type.<br>
<br>
It is useless to conflate the two into one single method.<br>
<br>
The name &quot;bitSize&quot; is already taken. Come up with another name, and I will agree with you.<div><div></div><div class="h5"><br>
<br>
______________________________<u></u>_________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org" target="_blank">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/<u></u>mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>