<div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Oct 4, 2011 at 7:46 PM, Jason Dagit <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:dagitj@gmail.com">dagitj@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div class="im">On Tue, Oct 4, 2011 at 12:54 AM, Luis Cabellos &lt;<a href="mailto:cabellos@ifca.unican.es">cabellos@ifca.unican.es</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
<br>
&gt; I understand your point. I didn&#39;t know the problems with cross module<br>
&gt; inlining that Haskell suffers. I learned the BSD3, I think is a good  and<br>
&gt; I&#39;ll change it on github and I&#39;ll put in the next release.<br>
<br>
</div>Oh cool.  Thanks!  I think that&#39;s for the best.  Someone sent me a<br>
link to this offline:<br>
<a href="https://github.com/judah/HsOpenCL" target="_blank">https://github.com/judah/HsOpenCL</a><br>
<br>
Maybe the two implementations can be merged into one super implementation :)</blockquote><div><br></div><div>Thanks for the hint. It appears to be a good source (great source, far better than OpenCL),  It&#39;s worth to follow it.</div>
<div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;"><div class="im">I see.  My experience with the OpenGL bindings is that it can still be</div>
confusing for users of the library.  The reason is simple, there are<br>
good docs for using the API from C and those docs tend to match the<br>
official specification.  So people who are new to the Haskell bindings<br>
will need some documentation that explains how to go from the C API to<br>
the Haskell API.  Otherwise users will need to read the source code<br>
directly to figure out where the function they need to call is<br>
located.  Good haddocks help, but that&#39;s just one part of the<br>
solution.  Being able to search for the function by name is also<br>
useful, so that&#39;s why I proposed adding something on to the end of the<br>
function name.  So that people using search in their browser on the<br>
haddocks or using grep at the command line would find the function(s)<br>
they are looking for and (hopefully) minimize time spent searching.<br>
<br>
It&#39;s a shame because, if we had dependent types we could encode the C<br>
API directly into Haskell.<br></blockquote><div>I&#39;ll think about, i put it in the issue. </div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
Thanks and I&#39;ll probably look at it some more this weekend.  I have a<br>
test program I&#39;m working on but I would need to port it to your<br>
bindings.</blockquote><div>Thank again, :)</div><div>  </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
Also, if you use the #fun macro from c2hs to create the foreign<br>
imports you will need to use at least version 0.16.4 as previous<br>
versions do not honor stdcall.<br>
<div><div></div><div class="h5"><br>
Jason<br></div></div></blockquote></div>