<font face="verdana,sans-serif">I added that after reading his feedback, and seeing the flaw in using TMChans.<br></font><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Feb 12, 2012 at 1:47 AM, wren ng thornton <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:wren@freegeek.org">wren@freegeek.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="im">On 2/9/12 2:29 PM, Felipe Almeida Lessa wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Your package uses TMChans which AFAIK are unbounded.  That means that<br>
if the writer is faster than the reader, then everything will be kept<br>
into memory.  This means that using TMChans you may no longer say that<br>
your program uses a constant amount of memory.  Actually, you lose a<br>
lot of your space reasoning since, being concurrent processes, you<br>
can&#39;t guarantee almost anything wrt. progress of the reader.<br>
</blockquote>
<br></div>
Of course, you&#39;re free to use TBMChans instead, which are bounded :)<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br>
<br>
-- <br>
Live well,<br>
~wren<br>
<br>
______________________________<u></u>_________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org" target="_blank">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/<u></u>mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
<br>
</font></span></blockquote></div><br>