How about recommending a Scala book instead of Java? That would teach a functional mindset, and on stepping back to Java, they&#39;d just have a different syntax for types, and some missing stuff.<div><br></div><div>On the Java side, I own &quot;A Little Java, a Few Patterns&quot; by Friedmann and Felleisen. This would certainly not make them impervious to anything functional, but I don&#39;t think it serves as a general introduction to Java. Maybe it would be suitable in addition to another book. I can second the recommendation of &quot;Effective Java&quot;.</div>
<div><br></div><div>- Chris<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Feb 17, 2012 at 12:19 AM, Ivan Perez <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ivanperezdominguez@gmail.com">ivanperezdominguez@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Hi, cafe,<br>
 I find myself in the unusual position of having to recommend a few<br>
books on Java to people who want to use it professionally. As the people<br>
demanding this live in Burundi, I can&#39;t really say &quot;Learn Haskell&quot;.<br>
Odds are they won&#39;t find a job there if they don&#39;t use mainstream languages.<br>
<br>
Is there any book on Java that approaches the language in a way<br>
that doesn&#39;t make programmers impervious to FP and Haskell?<br>
<br>
Not meaning to insult anybody here, I too learned Java before Haskell.<br>
But I also think it made learning Haskell much more difficult.<br>
<br>
Cheers,<br>
Ivan.<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br></div>