Thanks Yves for your advice. And I agree with you that too much laziness may be mind-blowing for most of the audience, yet this is one of the characteristics of Haskell, whether or not we like it and whatever troubles it can induce. <br>
<br>I really think the knapsack is simple, not too far away from real world and might be demonstrated with live code in 5 minutes. I will have a look anyway at more &quot;spectacular&quot; stuff like gloss or yesod but I fear this is out of scope.<br>
<br>Regards,<br>Arnaud<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Feb 28, 2012 at 12:27 PM, Yves Parès <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:yves.pares@gmail.com">yves.pares@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Nevermind, I think I found: <a href="http://jduchess.org/duchess-france/blog/battle-language-a-la-marmite/" target="_blank">http://jduchess.org/duchess-france/blog/battle-language-a-la-marmite/</a><br><br>You could try the JSON parser exercise. (<a href="https://github.com/revence27/JSON-hs" target="_blank">https://github.com/revence27/JSON-hs</a>) Or anything else with Parsec, it&#39;s a pretty good power-showing library.<div class="HOEnZb">
<div class="h5"><br>

<br><div class="gmail_quote">2012/2/28 Yves Parès <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:yves.pares@gmail.com" target="_blank">yves.pares@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">


Where exactly does that event take place?<br>Is it open to public?<br><br>And I strongly disadvise fibonacci, quicksort and other mind-blowing reality-escapist stuff. Show something real world and practical.<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">



2012/2/27 Arnaud Bailly <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:arnaud.oqube@gmail.com" target="_blank">arnaud.oqube@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">


<div><div>
Hello Cafe,<br><br>I will be (re)presenting Haskell in a &quot;Batlle Language&quot; event Wednesday evening: A fun and interactive contest where various programming language champions try to attract as much followers as possible in 5 minutes. <br>




<br>Having successfully experimented the power of live coding in a recent Haskell introduction for the Paris Scala User Group, I would like to do the same but given the time frame I need a simpler example than the music synthesizer program. <br>




<br>So I would like to tap in the collective wisdom looking for some concise, eye-opening, mind-shaking and if possible fun example of what one can achieve in Haskell. Things that sprung to my mind are rather dull: prime factors, fibonacci numbers. <br>




<br>Thanks in advance,<br>Arnaud<br>
<br></div></div><div>_______________________________________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org" target="_blank">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
<br></div></blockquote></div><br>
</blockquote></div><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br>