<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <br>
    <br>
    On 4/23/2012 10:17 PM, Brandon Allbery wrote:
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CAKFCL4XwEsJiphxa4yNZhV8hp2AXVAahstvrsX8AZ3m2tt3BHg@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <div dir="ltr">
        <div class="gmail_extra">On Mon, Apr 23, 2012 at 17:16, Gregg
          Lebovitz <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a moz-do-not-send="true"
              href="mailto:glebovitz@gmail.com" target="_blank">glebovitz@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span>
          wrote:<br>
          <div class="gmail_quote">
            <blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0
              .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
              <div bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
                <div class="im">On 4/23/2012 3:39 PM, Brandon Allbery
                  wrote:
                  <blockquote type="cite">
                    <div dir="ltr">
                      <div class="gmail_extra">
                        <div class="gmail_quote">
                          <div>The other dirty little secret that is
                            carefully being avoided here is the battle
                            between the folks for whom Haskell is a
                            language research platform and those who use
                            it to get work done.  It's not entirely
                            inaccurate to say the former group would
                            regard a fragmented module namespace as a
                            good thing, specifically because it
                            discourages people from considering it to be
                            stable....</div>
                        </div>
                      </div>
                    </div>
                  </blockquote>
                </div>
                Brandon, I find that a little hard to believe.  If the
                issues are similar to other systems and languages, then 
                I think it is more likely that no one has volunteered to
                work on it.  You volunteering to help?</div>
            </blockquote>
            <div><br>
            </div>
            <div>Yes, you do find it hard to believe; so hard that you
              went straight past it and tried to point to the "easy"
              technical solution to the problem you decided to see in
              place of the real one, which doesn't have a technical
              solution.</div>
          </div>
        </div>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    Brandon, I am very glad to make your acquaintance. I think you have
    given these issue much thought. That is good.<br>
    <br>
    No, I don't think I "went straight past it". I we are trying to
    address the same issue, but from different directions. If you take
    the time to look at my history, you'll find that I spent my career
    bridging the very gap you make so very salient.<br>
    <br>
    Here's where we differ, you see an untenable political issue, and I
    see a technical one. The question of how to support rapid innovation
    and stable deployment is not an us versus them problem. It is one of
    staging releases. The Linux kernel is a really good example. The
    Linux development team innovates faster than the community can
    absorb it. The same was true of the GNU team. Distributions
    addressed the gap by staging releases.<br>
    <br>
    I fought this very battle in the 1980s with the Andrew system. The
    technology coming out of the ITC (research community) was evolving
    faster than users could absorb. Researchers want to innovate and
    push the limits and users want stability. I've spoken with many in
    the Haskell research community, and I never heard anyone say "no, we
    want to obfuscate Haskell so that we never have to make is stable."
    I think both communities want success. The question is how to build
    a system that will address both.<br>
    <br>
    From your history, I see you are knowledgeable and well known on the
    deployment side of technology. You also understand what Haskell
    needs to move forward. So I ask you again, are you volunteering to
    help?<br>
    <br>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CAKFCL4XwEsJiphxa4yNZhV8hp2AXVAahstvrsX8AZ3m2tt3BHg@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <div dir="ltr">
        <div class="gmail_extra">
          <div class="gmail_quote">
            <div><br>
            </div>
          </div>
          -- <br>
          brandon s allbery                                      <a
            moz-do-not-send="true" href="mailto:allbery.b@gmail.com"
            target="_blank">allbery.b@gmail.com</a><br>
          wandering unix systems administrator (available)     (412)
          475-9364 vm/sms<br>
          <br>
        </div>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
  </body>
</html>