<div class="gmail_quote">  On Wed, Jun 6, 2012 at 6:20 AM, Doug McIlroy <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:doug@cs.dartmouth.edu" target="_blank">doug@cs.dartmouth.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

Last I looked (admittedly quite a while ago), the state of<br>
the art was strtod in <a href="http://www.netlib.org/fp/dtoa.c" target="_blank">http://www.netlib.org/fp/dtoa.c</a>.<br>
(Alas, dtoa.c achieves calculational perfection via a<br>
murmuration of #ifdefs.)<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>That was indeed the state of the art for about three decades, until Florian Loitsch showed up in 2010 with an algorithm that is usually far faster: <a href="http://www.serpentine.com/blog/2011/06/29/here-be-dragons-advances-in-problems-you-didnt-even-know-you-had/">http://www.serpentine.com/blog/2011/06/29/here-be-dragons-advances-in-problems-you-didnt-even-know-you-had/</a></div>
<div><br></div><div>Unfortunately, although I&#39;ve written Haskell bindings to his library, said library is written in C++, and our FFI support for C++ libraries is negligible and buggy. As a result, that code is disabled by default.</div>
<div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

It&#39;s disheartening to hear that important Haskell code has<br>
needlessly fallen from perfection--perhaps even deliberately.</blockquote><div><br></div><div>Indeed (and yes, it&#39;s deliberate). If I had the time to spare, I&#39;d attempt to fix the situation by porting Loitsch&#39;s algorithm to Haskell or C, but either one would be a lot of work - the library is 5,600 lines of tricky code.</div>
</div>