<p dir="ltr">I love it when people explain things or make a point using a relevant story (or parable) :)</p>
<p dir="ltr">It reminds me of when Michael Abrash would start his articles with the same. Ah, the memories...</p>
<p dir="ltr">Cheers Doug.</p>
<div class="gmail_quote">On 11 Nov 2012 17:00, &quot;Doug McIlroy&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:doug@cs.dartmouth.edu">doug@cs.dartmouth.edu</a>&gt; wrote:<br type="attribution"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
This note is an offshoot of &quot;curl package broken in Windows&quot;,<br>
where this item appeared:<br>
<br>
&gt; Did you know that Strawberry Perl includes a cygwin gcc?<br>
&gt; ...<br>
&gt; Maybe Haskell Platform could do the same.<br>
<br>
The suggestion brought to mind a true-life parable: the pump<br>
station at Tok.  (Tok is the third corner--after Anchorage<br>
and Fairbanks--of Alaska&#39;s triangular core of long-distance<br>
highways.) When I visited Tok long ago, it was a village of<br>
several hundred souls, almost all of whom were employed by one<br>
government agency or another, principal among which were the<br>
highway department, the Alaska Communication Service and the<br>
pump station, which kept fuel flowing to Eielson Air Force Base.<br>
<br>
The mission of the station was to keep one pump running 24 hours<br>
a day. Most of the time, of course, the pump hummed along by<br>
itself. To assure that, there had to be a standby machine,<br>
an operator to watch over both, and a mechanic who could fix<br>
them if need be.  For such a lonely job it was deemed well to<br>
have two operators. And there had to be two operators for each<br>
of several shifts. A little redundancy on the mechanical side<br>
seemed wise, too.  The crew and their families, say nothing of<br>
the pumps themselves, needed to be housed, and the installation<br>
needed to be supplied with the necessities of life. (The nearest<br>
supermarket was in Fairbanks, 300 miles away.)  These needs<br>
demanded a motor pool and property maintenance cadre, whose<br>
very presence reinforced the need.<br>
<br>
Thus the support team to keep one pump going ballooned to about<br>
100 people--a chain reaction that barely avoided criticality.<br>
<br>
So it seems to be with Haskell Platform, which aims to include<br>
&quot;all you need to get up and running&quot;--&quot;an extensive set of<br>
standard libraries and utilities with full documentation.&quot; I<br>
get the impression that the Platform is bedeviled by the<br>
same prospect of almost unfettered growth.<br>
<br>
[One ominous sign: the description of the Haskell Platform<br>
at <a href="http://lambda.haskell.org/platform/doc/current/start.html" target="_blank">lambda.haskell.org/platform/doc/current/start.html</a> suggests<br>
that one must join some mysterious Cabal, whose nature is<br>
hidden by a link to nowhere, simply to get started.]<br>
<br>
What principles guide the selection of components for &quot;all<br>
you need to get up and running&quot;?<br>
<br>
Doug McIlroy<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
</blockquote></div>