<font face="verdana,sans-serif">+1 to this. The friction of finding, setting up, and using Windows isn&#39;t even comparable to just sshing into another unix box and testing something quickly.<br><br>As a university student, I also find it relatively rare that I get to test on a Windows machine. My personal computer runs linux, my technical friends run linux or osx, and my non-technical ones run osx. Also, all the school servers that I have access to run either FreeBSD or Linux.<br>

<br>If I want to run something on linux system, I have about 40 different computers that I can ssh into and run code on.<br><br>If I want to run something on osx, I just have to call a friend and ask if they can turn on their computer and allow me to ssh in (to my own account, of course).<br>

<br>If I want to run something on Windows, I have to track down a friend (in person!), ask to borrow their computer for a few hours, get administrator access to install the Haskell Platform, get frustrated that HP hasn&#39;t been upgraded to 7.6, and give up.<br>

<br>It&#39;s just not practical, especially for the large amount of small (&lt;500 LOC) packages on Hackage.<br><br>  - Clark<br></font><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Nov 20, 2012 at 9:05 PM, Erik de Castro Lopo <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:mle+hs@mega-nerd.com" target="_blank">mle+hs@mega-nerd.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="im">Albert Y. C. Lai wrote:<br>
<br>
&gt; Clearly, since &gt;90% of computers have Windows, it should be trivial to<br>
&gt; find one to test on, if a programmer wants to. Surely every programmer<br>
&gt; is surrounded by Windows-using family and friends? (Perhaps to the<br>
&gt; programmer&#39;s dismay, too, because the perpetual &quot;I&#39;ve got a virus again,<br>
&gt; can you help?&quot; is so annoying?) We are not talking about BeOS.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Therefore, if programmers do not test on Windows, it is because they do<br>
&gt; not want to.<br>
<br>
</div>I have been an open source contributor for over 15 years. All the general<br>
purpose machines in my house run Linux. My father&#39;s and my mother-in-law&#39;s<br>
computers also run Linux (easier for me to provide support). For testing<br>
software, I have a PowerPC machine and virtual machines running various<br>
versions of Linux, FreeBSD and OpenBSD.<br>
<br>
What I don&#39;t have is a windows machine. I have, at numerous times, spent<br>
considerable amounts of time (and even real money for licenses) setting<br>
up (or rather trying to) windows in a VM and it is *always* considerably<br>
more work to set up, maintain and fix when something goes wrong. Setting<br>
up development tools is also a huge pain in the ass. And sooner or later<br>
they fail in some way I can&#39;t fix and I have to start again. Often its<br>
not worth the effort.<br>
<br>
At my day job we have on-demand windows VMs, but I am not officially<br>
allowed (nor do I intend to start) to use those resources for my open<br>
source work.<br>
<br>
So is it difficult for an open source contributor to test on windows?<br>
Hell yes! You have no idea how hard windows is in comparison to say<br>
FreeBSD. Even Apple&#39;s OS X is easier than windows, because I have<br>
friends who can give me SSH access to their machines.<br>
<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br>
Erik<br>
--<br>
----------------------------------------------------------------------<br>
Erik de Castro Lopo<br>
<a href="http://www.mega-nerd.com/" target="_blank">http://www.mega-nerd.com/</a><br>
</font></span><div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Haskell-Cafe mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org">Haskell-Cafe@haskell.org</a><br>
<a href="http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe" target="_blank">http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>