On 9/5/07, <b class="gmail_sendername">Tomi Owens</b> &lt;<a href="mailto:t.owens@hautlieu.sch.je">t.owens@hautlieu.sch.je</a>&gt; wrote:<div><span class="gmail_quote"></span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
Hi there. I&#39;m a teacher of Maths and am working my way through the Euler
Project problems for fun. I have mostly been using Basic, but have read
up about Haskell and think it looks like a sensible way to solve many of
the problems.
<br>
<br></blockquote></div><br>I see others have already answered your immediate question; however, I thought I&#39;d throw in some general comments.&nbsp; Project Euler is indeed a great way to learn some Haskell, but you will certainly run into problems with the numeric types (as you already have).&nbsp; Haskell is very picky about numeric types (for good reason!), and until you get used to it, it can be a big pain and a source of some confusion.&nbsp; I highly recommend that you read about type classes, and you may also want to read something like 
<a href="http://haskell.org/haskellwiki/Converting_numbers">http://haskell.org/haskellwiki/Converting_numbers</a>.&nbsp; As someone else already mentioned, asking questions in the #haskell IRC channel on <a href="http://irc.freenode.net">
irc.freenode.net</a> is also an excellent way to learn things and get past error messages and things like this which are probably simple, but you just can&#39;t figure out.<br><br>Hope this helps,<br>-Brent<br>