Hello,<br><br>I am very pleased to announce the release of iteratee-0.4.0.1.  This release features several breaking changes from prior versions, including a new low-level implementation.  Type names have been changed to bring them closer in line to Oleg&#39;s publications, the iteratee type has been simplified and requires fewer type variables, WrappedByteString is no longer necessary or provided, and many of the special combinators such as ($$) are no longer required.<br>


<br>Another very powerful feature is a user-extensible mechanism for iteratees to alter enumerator behavior, enabled by the new exception mechanism and the callback-based enumerator interface.  A simple example of this feature is the provided &quot;seek&quot; implementation.<br>


<br>Other improvements include re-written documentation and new example files in the Examples folder (available after unpacking the hackage distribution).  There is also a new tutorial in the Examples folder provided by Ben Lee, which details the new CPS-based implementation.   If you&#39;ve tried iteratee before but had trouble understanding it, please consider having another look.  I have also released the package &quot;iteratee-mtl&quot;, which is identical to the main package except it is based upon mtl.<br>


<br>Due to the type name changes, iteratee-0.4 is incompatible with prior releases.  Updating code to this release can be as simple as changing types/imports, although in many cases the conversion will be more involved.  For those users who are unable to update to this release, I am also pleased to announce Iteratee-0.3.6, the final release of the 0.3.x line.  It has been somewhat cleaned up and features several powerful new functions contributed by Conrad Parker and Brian Lewis, including &quot;ioIter&quot;, &quot;mapM_&quot;, and &quot;enumFdFollow&quot;.  These functions will be migrated to the 0.4 line in due course.<br>


<br>I am most grateful to many people who contributed to this release.  Thanks especially to Conrad Parker, Antoine Latter, Ben Lee, Paulo Tanimoto, and Edward Yang for many significant improvements.<br><br>Thank you,<br>
John Lato<br>