The examples are currently written in a fairly brittle style (they assume no exceptions, uninterrupted connection, etc). Recommendations to beef up both the examples and the safety of the framework in general would be greatly appreciated.<br>

<br><a href="https://github.com/DanBurton/netspec/tree/master/examples">https://github.com/DanBurton/netspec/tree/master/examples</a><br><br>--<br>Dan Burton<br><a href="mailto:danburton.email@gmail.com">danburton.email@gmail.com</a><br>

<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Feb 21, 2012 at 7:11 PM, Dan Burton <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:danburton.email@gmail.com">danburton.email@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

Haskellers,<br><br>I&#39;m pleased to announce the first public release of 
NetSpec, a little Network library to simplify networking tasks that 
involve a fixed number of connections, using Erlang-esque send and receive primitives.<br><br>Check out the docs: <a href="http://hackage.haskell.org/package/netspec" target="_blank">http://hackage.haskell.org/package/netspec</a><br>




And the repo on github (with examples): <a href="https://github.com/DanBurton/netspec" target="_blank">https://github.com/DanBurton/netspec</a><br><br>--<br clear="all">Dan Burton<br>
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